Immigrant Entrepreneurs Poised To Shake Up The U.S. Culinary Landscape, Part II

Source: Forbes

Le Bon Magot is a high-end, natural line of chutneys, marmalatas and caponatas created by Naomi Mobed, the founder and CEO. Elegantly designed glass jars that show off the rich reds, greens and dark purples of Le Bon Magot's products, are stacked in the rear of the white booth. A crowd of buyers stand at the front counter to try samples, some people look dazed as they try and place the exquisite and unusual flavors.

Mobed was born in Pakistan, raised in Iran and moved the U.S. at 11-years-old after a few stops in Asia Pacific and Europe. She spent most of her adult life working in finance and banking abroad. When she returned to the U.S. two years ago, Mobed decided it was finally the time to launch the food business she’d envisioned, based on family recipes.

“I knew these flavors need to come alive,” says Mobed, “because there’s nothing else like it out there.” She only uses top quality ingredients and wants consumers to feel like they are eating a condiment they’d find in her family home. “And we’re not a jar-oriented family,” assures Mobed, “we cook everything.”

Le Bon Magot, which means “The Hidden Treasure” in French, is based in Lawrenceville, New Jersey and the products are made in Long Island’s North Fork.

“We’re tiny,” concedes Mobed, who aims to scale-up her business while retaining the high quality of ingredients. “I refuse to believe we live in a society where we cannot manage a supply chain of fresh ingredients,” exclaims Mobed.

Mobed works with a six-person team, including consultants and part time workers. Le Bon Magot products sell in specialty shops across the country like New York City ‘s Épicerie Boulud and Kalustyan’s among others, and Formaggio’s in Boston.

While Mobed believes there is an energized environment around the mainstream embrace of spices and culinary diversity, she notes that some consumers don’t understand her products. “What is a chutney? Why do you need it?” she’s been asked. “But once people taste it," says Mobed "they are much more open to it.”